Owen, David Dale; Mineral lands of the United States. Report of a geological exploration of part of Iowa, Wisconsin, and Illinois, made in the autumn of the year 1839.

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Owen, David Dale; Mineral lands of the United States. Report of a geological exploration of part of Iowa, Wisconsin, and Illinois, made in the autumn of the year 1839. House Executive Doc. No. 239,  Blair and Rives, Printer, 1845. Washington, octavo, pp. 161, numerous charts,  27 plates, maps and sections, eight hand-colored. 
 
The work is complete and in a modern half calf with marbles boards and gilt spine titles. The binding is tight and clean with very minor shelf wear. The text is clean with light foxing mining to margins and a early European library stamp on the first page. The maps and plates are clean and bright.
 
This is the revised version of Owen's 1840 House report and his 1844 Senate report, with different pagination and two additional plates.  Owen was appointed "to make a survey of the Dubuque and Mineral Point districts of Wisconsin and Iowa. The report assesses the geology, minerals, soils and timber resources in an area of 11,000 square miles on both sides of the Mississippi River, from Davenport, Iowa north to the Wisconsin River. Owen was the first to point out the rich mineral nature of the Iowa and Wisconsin lands and provide details on the lead, copper, iron, and zinc ores of the region and that the ores of lead and zinc were limited to the magnesian limestone. His geological sections are unequaled for their artistic beauty and many of the plates above are from his personal drawings. The illustrations have been praised for their artistic beauty and include colored maps and sections, plates of fossils, plates of scenery and views, and a striking plate of underground lead mine workings and miners. Again, many of the plates were drawn by Owen himself. The spectacular Indian mounds of Wisconsin are noted and illustrated in plates. A lengthy appendix describes each township. The largest map (22 x 28 inches)  is the: "Geological chart of part of Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois”, is beautifully detailed in color and shows locations of lead mines and copper and iron-ore deposits.