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Rare Vertebrate Paleontology Books: Franz Weidenreich & Pei Wenzhong (also Pei Wen-chung): Four Studies on Peking Man and Choukoutien. Palaeontologia Sinica, Series D, Peking, 1936-1939.

$450.00

Rare Vertebrate Paleontology Books: Franz Weidenreich & Pei Wenzhong (also Pei Wen-chung): Four Studies on Peking Man and Choukoutien. Palaeontologia Sinica, Series D, Peking, 1936-1939.

$450.00
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Book 765-C 963
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20.00 LBS
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Franz Weidenreich & Pei Wenzhong (also Pei Wen-chung): Four Studies on Peking Man and Choukoutien. Palaeontologia Sinica, Series D, Peking, 1936-1939.


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1. Weidenreich, Franz; The Mandibles of Sinanthropus Pekinensis: A Comparative Study. Pal. Sinica, Series D, Vol. 7, Peking, 1936. Quarto, pp. 134, 15 plates, 100 text illustrations.
2. Weidenreich, Franz; The Dentition of Sinanthropus Pekinensis: A Comparative Odontography of the Hominids. Pal. Sinica, New Series D, #1, 2 vols., Peking, 1937. Quarto, text vol., pp. 180, 27 tables. Atlas, pp. 2, 36 plates with descriptive text pages, 49 diagrams.
3. Wen-Chung, Pei; The Upper Cave Industry of Choukotien. Pal Sinica, Series D, Peiping, 1939. Quarto, pp. 58, 8 plates (1 colored), 16 text figures.
4. Pei Wen-Chung; Le Role des Animaux et des Causes Naturelle dans la Cassure des Os. Pal Sinica New Series D, #7, Nanking, 1938. Quarto, pp. 60, 21 plates.

Franz Weidenreich (1873 - 1948, New York City U.S.) was a German anatomist and physical anthropologist who made major contributions to the study of human evolution.
Weidenreich studied at the University of Strasbourg where he earned a medical degree in 1899. From 1921 to 1924 he served as a Professor of anthropology at the University of Heidelberg. Because of his Jewish ancestry he left Germany in 1934 for the University of Chicago and from there went to China to the Peking Union Medical College. In 1935 he succeeded Canadian paleoanthropologist Davidson Black as honorary director of the Cenozoic Research Laboratory of the Geological Survey of China where he became involved in the studies of Peking Man, then known as Sinanthropus pekinensis. The fossils were unearthed at Zhoukoudian,(Choukoutien) China. Weidenreich’s fossil descriptions are without equal with his two major studies being on the mandibles and dentition. His writings reflected a growing interest in skeletal anatomy that eventually found expression in studies of locomotion, posture, and bone structure as related to problems in primate evolution. In 1941 he joined the American Museum of Natural History, and until his death concerned himself with human evolution, a field in which he made major contributions. We offer here his two major studies on the mandibles and dentition of Peking Man.
Pei Wenzhong (Pei Wen-chung) (1904-1982) was a Chinese paleontologist, archaeologist and anthropologist born in Fengnan. Professor Pei is considered a founding figure of Chinese anthropology.?He graduated from Peking University in 1928 and went to work for the Cenozoic Research Laboratory of the Geological Survey of China joining the excavations of the Peking Man Site at Zhoukoudian, where he was named the field director of the excavations the following year. The first fossil hominid skullcap was recovered by Pei.?From 1933 to 1934, he supervised the excavation of the Upper Cave at Zhoukoudian and was director of the Zhoukoudian Office of the Cenozoic Research Laboratory of the Geological Survey of China. He left the excavation in 1935 to pursue a doctoral degree at the University of Paris and was succeeded by Professor Jia Lanpo). He returned to the excavation in 1937, shortly before operations ceased due to the Japanese invasion of north China. His two studies offered here resulted from those excavations.
From 1933 to 1934, he supervised the excavation of the Upper Cave at Zhoukoudian and was director of the Zhoukoudian Office of the Cenozoic Research Laboratory of the Geological Survey of China. He left the excavation in 1935 to pursue a doctoral degree at the University of Paris and was succeeded by Professor Jia Lanpo). He returned to the excavation in 1937, shortly before they ceased due to the Japanese invasion of north China.?After his work at Zhoukoudian, Professor Pei worked at many other archaeological sites, including Djalainor (Zhalainu'er) in eastern Inner Mongolia and in Gansu. In 1955 he was elected to membership in the Chinese Academy of Sciences, became the first Chairman of Chinese Association of Natural Science Museums, and the second director of Beijing Museum of Natural History. Until his death in 1982, he worked at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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