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Rare Travel book: Ward, Henry George; Mexico in 1827 by H.G. Ward, Esq. His Majesty’s Chargé d’Affaires in that Country during the Years 1825, 1826, and Part of 1827. London: 1828.

$1,800.00

Rare Travel book: Ward, Henry George; Mexico in 1827 by H.G. Ward, Esq. His Majesty’s Chargé d’Affaires in that Country during the Years 1825, 1826, and Part of 1827. London: 1828.

$1,800.00
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Book 718-E
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Ward, Henry George; Mexico in 1827 by H.G. Ward, Esq. His Majesty’s Chargé d’Affaires in that Country during the Years 1825, 1826, and Part of 1827. 1st edition, Two volumes, London: Henry Colburn, New Burlington Street, 1828. London: Printed by S. and R. Bentley, Dorset Street, Fleet Street]. Vol. I: [i-v] vi-xix [1], [1-3] 4-591 [1] pp.; Vol. II: [i-v] vi-viii, [1-3] 4-730 [2, Colburn ads] pp., 13 plates after original artwork by Lady Emily Elizabeth Swinburne Ward, 5 of which are folded (10 aquatints, 1 with hand coloring, 3 lithographs), 5 wood-engraved text illustrations, 2 folded engraved maps (see plate and map list below), tables in text.
Two volumes, 8vo (24.3 x 15.2 cm), original tan boards (as issued), original printed paper spine labels, completely untrimmed, partially unopened. Binding with some light spotting, joints lightly worn, save for occasional very mild foxing, interior, plates and maps very fine and fresh.  it would be difficult to find a better one. Set is housed in a brown linen fleece-lined slipcase. In exceptionally nice condition. 

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A British diplomat, Sir Henry George Ward (1797-1860). was the first British Chargé d’Affaires in Mexico. Ward entered the diplomatic service in 1816, and first visited Mexico in 1823, as a member of a British government commission assessing the desirability of establishing trading relations following Independence. He was accompanied by his wife Emily Elizabeth Swinburne, on his return to Mexico in 1825 in his role as Chargé d’Affaires. Two years later, Ward wrote a detailed description of how he saw Mexico which was published as Mexico in 1827. The work contains illustrations by his wife and was an early appraisal of the fledgling Mexican Republic, and provides numerous details of trade, mining, geology, economic activity and topography.
Ward was decidedly anti-American. His main goal, apparently, was to try to prevent the USA from expanding its territory at the expense of Mexico. The British diplomat believed that the incorporation of Texas into the Anglo-American states was inevitable unless the Mexican government could stem the wave of immigrants flooding southwards into the region. The Mexican government was relatively unstable at this time, with frequent changes of leaders. Ward summed up the political situation that he encountered as one in which, after thirteen years of civil war, the form of government had still not been determined, with great differences of opinion existing with respect to the desired degree of central authority. He found it difficult to conceive of any country less prepared than Mexico for the “transition from despotism to democracy.”?Ward promoted the signing of a UK-Mexico treaty of friendship, trade and migration, but the UK gradually lost influence in Mexico despite Ward’s best efforts. Meanwhile, the Us diplomat; Poinsett, was trying his hardest to purchase Texas. His meddling in Mexican internal politics antagonized the government of Vicente Guerrero to the point where his recall was demanded in 1829.?Another major concern of Ward’s  was that the United States would eventually gain control over Texas ports. This would put them only three days away by boat from Tampico and Veracruz (Mexico’s main trading port) and mean that Mexico was vulnerable to invasion. Ward’s worst fears in this regard were realized later in the nineteenth century (the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848).?The work remains one of the most systematic and complete work of of the time on Mexico.  ??The exquisite plates were created from the original art work of the author’s wife, Lady Emily Elizabeth Swinburne Ward (1798-1882). The plates and maps are:
Maps and plates are:
Maps:?Mexico. London, Published by Henry Colburn, New Burlington Strt. April, 1828 Engraved by Sidy. Hall, Bury Strt. Bloomsby. 53.7 x 67.5 cm. Shows the Transmissippi West and Texas.
Map of Routes to the Principal Mining Districts in the Central States of Mexico. London, Published by Henry Colburn, New Burlington Strt. April 1828 Engraved by Sidy. Hall, Bury Strt. Bloomsby. 40.3 x 55.5 cm.
Plates:
Mexico. From the Azotea of the House of H. M’s Mission, San Cosme Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. T.M. Baynes lithog. Uncolored folded lithograph.
Agave Mexicana Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored aquatint.
Canada de Marfil, Entry to Guanaxuato Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored folded aquatint.
Puente del Rey by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored aquatint.
Collegiate Church, of Nuestra Senora de Guadaloupe Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. T.M. Baynes lithog. Uncolored lithograph.
View of the Town of Jalapa, with the Coffre de Perote Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Published by H. Colburn, London, 1828. On Stone by W. Gauci Printed by Engelmann & Co. Uncolored folded lithograph.
Chapultepec Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored aquatint.
Hacienda de Chapingo Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored folded aquatint.
An Arastre, or Crushing Mill Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored aquatint.
The Galeria of the Hacienda de Salgado Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored folded aquatint.
Patio of the Hacienda de Salgado Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored folded aquatint.
The Ascent to Catorce Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Uncolored folded aquatint.
Interior of an Indian Hut, El Bozal Drawn by Mrs. H.G. Ward. Pub: by H. Colburn, London, 1828. J. Clark, sculp. Hand-colored aquatint.

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