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Rare Geology Book: Verifier (Murray, III, John); Scepticism in Geology, 1878.

$300.00

Rare Geology Book: Verifier (Murray, III, John); Scepticism in Geology, 1878.

$300.00
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Book 603-C
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Verifier (Murray, III, John); Scepticism in Geology and the Reasons For It an Assemblage of Facts from Nature Opposed to the Theory of “Causes now in Action” and Refuting it. By Verifier. 2nd edition. John Murray, Albemarle Street. 1878. Octavo, xii, 2, errata tipped in, 132, frontispiece, 7 plates and figures.

The work is complete and in the original green cloth with gilt cover and spine titles. The binding is tight and clean, minor scuffing to boards, text is clean, a signature is starting, Book plate of noted vertebrate paleontologist Henry F. Osborn on front paste down and presentation plate to A.M.N.H. below. Inscribed by publisher (John Murray) to “Dr. Henry” on end sheet. A rare and clean association copy in very good condition.

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The book “Scepticism in Geology” was published under the pseudonym 'Verifier” by the noted publishing house, John Murray in London. The true author of the work was not known for many years. Eventually the records from the publishing house gave the author as none other then the publisher John Murray III (1808-1892). ?The firm was founded by John Murray’s grandfather John Murray I (1745–1793) in 1768.  John Murray I was also one of the founding sponsors of the London evening newspaper The Star in 1788. He was succeeded by his son, John Murray II, who made the publishing house one of the most important and influential in Britain. He was a friend of many leading writers of the day and launched the Quarterly Review in 1809. He was the chosen publisher of numerous authors including Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Washington Irving, George Crabbe and many others.?Muuray I was succeeded by his son, John Murray II, who made the publishing house one of the most important and influential in Britain. He was a friend of many leading writers of the day and launched the Quarterly Review in 1809. He was the publisher for Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Washington Irving, George Crabbe and many others. His most notable author was Lord Byron, who became a close friend and correspondent. Murray published many of his major works, paying him over £20,000 in rights. On 10 March 1812 Murray published Byron's second book, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, which sold out in five days. On 17 May 1824 Murray II also participated in one of the most notorious acts in the annals of literature. Byron had given him the manuscript of his personal memoirs to publish later on. Together with five of Byron's friends and executors, Murray II decided to destroy Byron's manuscripts because he thought the scandalous details would damage Byron's reputation. Opposed only by Thomas Moore, the two volumes of memoirs were dismembered and burnt in the fireplace at Murray's office. No one will ever know what was contained in the memoirs.?John Murray III (1808–1892 and the Verifier) continued the business and published Charles Eastlake's first English translation of Goethe's Theory of Colours (1840), David Livingstone's Missionary Travels (1857), Lyell’s works and Charles Darwin's Origin of Species (1859). Murray III contracted with Herman Melville to publish Melville's first two books, Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847) in England; both books were presented as nonfiction travel narratives in Murray's “Home and Colonial Library” series, alongside such works as the 1845 second edition of Darwin's journals from his travels on the HMS Beagle.?What was John Murray III's interest in geology? His early education at the Charterhouse School was followed by enrollment at Edinburgh University. Here he became interested in geology and mineralogy. Following his studies he traveled extensively on the continent and observed the geology and geography with interests but always looking for proof of a divine creation. Murray, although successfully publishing the works of Darwin and Lyell, actually disagreed with much of their theories and thus wrote under the pseudonym 'Verifier', his own opposing geological arguments in 'Scepticism in Geology'. He argues for an age of the earth of no more then ten to fifteen million years and relies on the forces of earthquakes and water for forming the earth in this short time frame. Many of the arguments put forth by Murray are the same erroneous ones that creationists make today.

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