Newberry, John Strong; The Paleozoic Fishes of North America. 1889

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Product Description
Newberry, John Strong; The Paleozoic Fishes of North America. USGS Monograph 16, Washington DC, 1889. Large quarto, pp.340, 53 plates, some folding, with descriptive text to each plate.
 
The work is complete and in the original brown cloth with gilt titles. Binding is tight and clean, gilt titles bright, text clean and bright, small smudge mark on lower binding edge from price tag removal. 
 
John Strong Newberry (1822 – 1892) was an American physician, geologist and paleontologist. He developed an interest in paleontology and geology at an early age when fossils were found and collected from his Father’s coal mines in Ohio. James Hall collected many of these fossils and undoubtedly had an influence on the young Newberry. Upon receiving a medical degree he set up a practice in Cleveland but soon turned his attention to the geological sciences. In 1855, he joined an exploring expedition under Lieutenant Williamson, sent out by the War Department to examine the country between San Francisco and the Columbia River. In 1857–58 he acted as geologist to an expedition headed by Lieutenant Joseph Christmas Ives, sent out to explore the Colorado River. He served as naturalist on an expedition in 1859 under Captain Macomb, which explored southwestern Colorado and adjacent parts of UtahArizona, and New Mexico, finding the remains of the dinosaur Dystrophaeus. Each of these investigations led to detailed reports and publications of Newberry's observations. After the Civil War he became professor of geology and paleontology at Columbia University School of MinesHe held this position for 24 years. During his tenure with Columbia, he created a museum of over 100,000 specimens, principally collected by himself, which served to illustrate his lectures in paleontology and economic geology. At that time, the collection contained the best representations of the mineral resources and fossils of the United States to be found anywhere. In addition to his teaching duties, Newberry was Director of the Ohio Geological Survey; a member of the Illinois Geological Survey; president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; president of the New York Academy of Sciences; and president of the Torrey Botanical ClubHe assisted in the organization of the Geological Society of America at Cleveland in 1888, and served on the commission to organize an international geological congress, of which he was president in 1891. The Murchison Medal of the Geological Society of London was awarded to him in 1888. Throughout his career, Newberry was to make major contributions to descriptive paleontology. His monograph on Paleozoic Fishes was one of his final works. New berry provides an historical review of the study of fossil fishes and follows with a systematic description of the known fossil fishes from the Silurian, Devonian, and Carboniferous.