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Cripple Creek: Lindgren, Waldemar & Ransome, Frederick L.; Geology and Gold deposits of the Cripple Creek District, Colorado. 1906

$260.00

Cripple Creek: Lindgren, Waldemar & Ransome, Frederick L.; Geology and Gold deposits of the Cripple Creek District, Colorado. 1906

$260.00
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Book 541-H
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Lindgren, Waldemar & Ransome, Frederick L.; Geology and Gold deposits of the Cripple Creek District, Colorado. Washington, USGS P. P. 54, 1906. Quarto, pp. xix, 516, v, 29 plates and folded maps, 64 text illustrations. 
 
The work is complete and in a contemporary cloth with gilt titles. The binding is near fine. The text, plates and maps are very clean. The maps are in a pocket in the rear. In very good condition.  
 
FREE SHIPPING WITHIN THE US ONLY ON THIS ITEM. OVERSEAS PLEASE REQUEST A QUOTE. 
 
Waldemar Lindgren (February 14, 1860 - November 3, 1939) was an American geologist and was one of the founders of modern economic geology.
In 1884, he began a 31-year career with the US Geological Survey working on ore deposits in the Rocky Mountains. In 1905, he helped found the journal Economic Geology and in 1912, he was appointed head of the Department of Geology at MIT.
Frederick Leslie Ransome, (1868–1935) was an American geologist.He was educated at the University of California and was employed by the US Geological Survey. His many official reports and bulletins dealt mainly with aspects of economic geology. He helped found the journal Economic Geology.
Lindgren and Ransome worked together to produce this classic study on the Cripple Creek District in Colorado which was one of the world's most famous gold mining districts. 
The Cripple Creek District was first studied in detail in 1894 by Whitman Cross and R. A. F. Penrose and reported on in the United States Geological Survey's 16th Annual Report in 1895. Prior to 1901, the annual gold output from Cripple Creek surpassed that of any other district in the Front Range of Colorado. The maximum output was reached in 1900 with $18,000,000. in gold and then started to decline. Production costs increased as new ore bodies were sought at increased depths. Few mines were now profitable, many were over capitalized, and thus few mines were now yielding dividends to the investors. All of these factors led to labor tensions between mine owners and miners with two serious conflicts occurring. 
The USGS was petitioned by the state to study the district and determine if profitable ores persisted at depths below 1000 feet and also find where new ore bodies were located above 1000 feet. 
Lindgren and Ransome were assigned to survey the district in detail and address the concerns of mining companies. There study showed deposits persisting above 1000 feet and possible new ore areas. Production in Cripple Creek increased but again fluctuated for several years and then gradually declined through the 1940s with the last major mill closing in 1962. The total output was $400,000,000. in gold or 48% of the State total. 
The value of Professional Paper 54 for the collector and historian is the detailed description of the mine workings, ore bodies and mineralogy of Cripple Creek at its zenith.

 

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